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Monday, January 22nd, 2007

Food In The Belly's Review on AllMusic.com

Review by Jo-Ann Greene

As stereotypes go, a surfer with something worthwhile to say is a contradiction in terms, but Xavier Rudd is no cookie-cutter mold, but a singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist with simple, yet profound, thoughts on life to impart. Rudd opens Food in the Belly by taking stock of himself on "The Letter," a song bookended by the highly contemplative and autobiographical "September 24, 1999." Both lay the groundwork for his life-affirming philosophy that revolves around our connections to this wonderful planet, a theme explored on "Energy" and the paean to "The Mother" Earth, and reflected in the ecologically minded "Messages." In nature one can find a tranquility of soul that permeates this entire set, but that doesn't mean that the terrible

disturbances of war and disease don't inevitably impinge. Rudd addresses both on "Pockets of Peace," as well as the hunger that inflects so many on "Famine," a song at least partially inspired by Jimmy Cliff's "Sufferin' on the Land." Yet even these horrors can't overcome Rudd's overwhelming optimism, prominent on "Connie's Song" and the hope-filled "Generation Fade," while counseling us all to be grateful for what we have on the title track. Read More

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