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Monday, August 13th, 2012

Lost In The Trees Announces Fall Headlining Tour

Ground-breaking musical collective Lost in the Trees are embarking on a headlining North American tour this fall in continued support of their acclaimed album A Church That Fits Our Needs, which the Los Angeles Times called “stunningly gorgeous”.

Beginning in Knoxville, TN on October 9th, Lost in the Trees will be joined by Durham, NC folk quartet Midtown Dickens for the entirety of the tour, as well as Dana Buoy (of the acclaimed psych-rock heroes, Akron/Family) on the west coast. The group will also join the lineup of The Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival on October 6th in Pittsboro, NC and City Arts Festival in Seattle, WA on October 20th. Tickets for the fall tour go on sale starting August 13th. All on sale times and locations can be found by visiting: LostInTheTrees.com.

In addition, Lost in the Trees will be performing a very special show at Duke University on Friday, December 7th at The Reynolds Industries Theatre as part of the acclaimed Duke Performances 2012 season. Lost in the Trees will be joined by a chamber orchestra — 12 strings, harp, piano, and percussion — to fully realize the band’s arrangements in an ample, resonant hall. Tickets for this special evening are on-sale and can be purchased here.

Lost in the Trees is an inventive ensemble from Chapel Hill, North Carolina helmed by composer and songwriter Ari Picker. The band merges the dramatic symphonic elements of classical music with the accessibility of American folk and modern pop, creating a sound that is simultaneously intimate and sonically ambitious. A Church That Fits Our Needs is a work of vaulting ambition, a cathedral built on loss and transformation. In 2009 Picker lost his mother, an artist in her own right, when she took her own life. With the new record he set about transforming the events into a musical tribute. While this might sound like a somber affair, it is anything but. The group utilizes rhythm as its own emotional language, never losing the propulsive inevitability and vitality of great rock and roll.